Posts tagged ‘DIY’

March 4, 2012

3D Printer Build – Part 1

by hstrykdiy

Just a little update from MakeHaven – The 3D Printer build is underway. In one day they got pretty far with the build, you can read the full post here by MakeHaven member John Scrudato. They have almost finished frame of the printer (a Reprap Prusa Mendel) and all 3 axes are working great. Next step is to build the extruder and attach the motors. As John writes, “Then we can connect a PC and start printing some plastic!”


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February 29, 2012

MakeHaven – A New Maker Space in New Haven

by hstrykdiy


I’m excited to announce that New Haven, CT has its own maker space and I am an official member! We’re called MakeHaven and we’re just starting out, so we’re in the process of getting furniture, growing our inventory and planning our mission and goals for the year. This Saturday we will be meeting to start making a 3D printer. (I will probably be spending my time documenting the process and working on some sewing.) So far, a majority of the members are into computing, coding and circuit bending. I plan on rounding out the space with my various crafting skills. We had a mini introduction to soldering this Tuesday and I did my first ever soldering. (I think, when it comes to burning hot object near my hands, I will stick to my trusty hot glue gun.) It’s been very exciting to be a part of this space from the very start. We were discussing all the possibilities for projects we could work on together. I was happy to find that not only are they up for some crafting, but home brewing, cooking (the space has an old kitchen!) and everything and anything to do with DIY. We have a great group of members who are passionate about DIY and I feel so lucky to continue on where our class left off and have a space so close to home! I hope to post our progress here on the DIYCultures blog. Classmates, if you are looking for an escape from the big city and looking to craft and solder, just let me know!

February 29, 2012

DIY Times

by hstrykdiy

via http://nataliebyrne.tumblr.com:

“The DIY Times is great zine series all about people with a DIY attitude to life, whether that’s printing t-shirts, making tables or running a music festival. They have about 20 pages in each zine with a screen printed cover. DIY Times is by NO GUTS NO GLORY is a community based collective of creative people from around the UK, established in November 2009 by Nathan Blaker based in Exeter UK.”

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December 2, 2011

Apartment Gardening

by stephaniecorleto

While the system of hydropnic apartment gardening made from discarded plastic bottles is amazing (and something I am intend on trying!), what stuck with me was how she described our dependence on systems. This drive for autonomy and self reliance sparks all DIY initiatives:

I like many of you am one of the two billion people on earth who live in cities. And there are days when I feel how much I rely on other people for pretty much everything in my life, and some days that can even be a little scary.

-Britta Riley

But autonom and self-reliance do not mean alone. With the “R&D-I-Y”  – research and development your self. DIY does not have to be singular, as our class has been throwing around it is ‘Do-It-Together.”

http://video.ted.com/assets/player/swf/EmbedPlayer.swf

November 7, 2011

“DIY: Revolution 3.0–Beta”

by hstrykdiy

knitta tank
Writer Dennis Stevens recently wrote an article titled, “DIY: Revolution 3.0–Beta” found on American Crafts Magazine’s website. I found the article to be quite interesting, however despite Stevens’ disclaimer: “… I am not making a simple series of generalizations about generations, social movements and the experience of groups of people,” – he ends up doing exactly that. Now, to be fair – he was trying to cover a lot of territory in a relatively short article. Stevens is comparing studio craft with “diy craft”. His goal is to “place the DIY craft movement within the larger cultural context of generational movements, as these craft practitioners comprise groups whose values and aims need to be acknowledged and understood.” He had my attention through most of the article and then at the end he completely disappointed me:

…The effect is that regardless of their political ambitions, anytime someone needlepoints a pleasant-looking phrase gleefully embedded with curse words, knits a skull and crossbones or makes a cozy for a tank, these cultural statements demonstrate 1) the semiotic literacy of the generation, 2) the nostalgic irony through which this generation prefers to operate and 3) how cynicism sometimes finds its way to the surface of this creative work. Quite simply, this work makes its cultural statements indirectly and quietly. Rather than bringing revolution to the front door and kicking it open, as their parents may have hoped to do, these independent makers are using the disarming and unassuming aesthetic of diy craft’s remixed domestic creativity to make subversive statements about the world in which they live.

I have to say that in my personal opinion the acts of creating a needlepoint with curse words or knitting a skull and crossbones are completely different than making “a cozy for a tank”. The first two examples are quite passive acts and I can understand his claim that the “work makes its cultural statements indirectly and quietly”. The pink tank he is referring to is ‘Pink M.24 Chaffee‘, a piece by Danish artist Marianne Jorgensen.

via Jorgensen’s site:

The pink covering consists of more than a 4000 pink squares- 15 x 15 centimetres – knitted by volunteers from Denmark, the UK , USA and several other countries. People were invited through Cast Off Knitting Club, from friend to friend either by word of mouth or over the internet, and by a number of knitting groups made for this specific project, or other already existing knitting groups.

Although the piece was placed in front of the Nikolaj Contemporary Art Center in Copenhagen, and thus an arranged, commissioned piece, I still find this to be a louder act of protest than Stevens’ so neatly wraps up as “indirect and quiet”. I feel that craftivism and DIY craft can make their statements passively, but I also believe there are makers out there making statements through their craft that are “bringing revolution to the front door and kicking it open”. I also don’t believe it’s fair to either outlet to wrap indie craft up with craftivism. Just as with any act of art placement and intent is key. Is the piece meant for personal use? Is it a guerrilla act reclaiming a public space? Is it meant to address social unrest? Is it the act of one artist or a collective? If, as Stevens writes, “these craft practitioners comprise groups whose values and aims need to be acknowledged and understood” – then I think they deserve to be free of such generalizations.

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October 15, 2011

DIY & Crowdsourced Documentaries

by stephaniecorleto

I came across these two documentaries that are interesting examples of DIY documentaries.

Tarnation is the earlier of the two, released in 2003. Director Jonathan Caouette documented 19 years of his life with his schizophrenic mother. With a budget of $218 (edited with the free iMovie program) and two decades worth of super 8 film, photographs, answering machine recordings Caouette was able to create a world renowned film that received accolades from  Independent Spirit, Gotham Awards, National Society of Film Critics, and London International Film Festival.

Life in a Day was released this year that was directed by Kevin Macdonald  and produced by Ridley Scott. Life in a Day is made up of YouTube submissions from people who filmed their lives on July 24, 2010. Thousands are included in the final product.  While I have only seen the trailer and various clips from YouTube there is something so powerful about bringing together all these strangers who are willing to share a little part of themselves. May I suggest a screening day?

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September 13, 2011

Bio: Edmund Kasubinski

by Edmund Kasubinski

Since I already biographicized myself in class to most of you the other day, I’ll be brief.  I could just end the post right there (I did invent a word in the previous sentence) but I’ll go on:

I mentioned my musical DIY project, which is entitled Pepper Coat.  It’s not so much a pseudonym as it is the name of the band.  And it’s not so much a band as it is only comprised of me.  And, I guess people have called me Pepper Coat directly before, so I suppose Pepper Coat is in fact a pseudonym.  You can call me Edmund though.

A performer/musician pretty much has to be DIY these days, doing the managing and recording and promoting.  All that stuff, and also if they’re ambitious (and 9 times out of 10 eccentric) they can even play all the instruments and self-produce (see:  R. Stevie Moore)  So, I try and do that kinda stuff:

This one is me DIYing a punk band:

And this one is me Elvising with myself:

Well, enough about Pepper Coat.  I hope to work with everyone in the class to learn about new DIY initiatives.  I really had no idea how much stuff was going on out there and I’d like to get in on it… any of it, really.

Pepper Coat

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